Category: books

Instantaneous love

Instantaneous love

Insta-love is such a hack phrase. It’s a substitute for instant love but instantaneous is such a fun word, don’t you think? Generally, it’s used as a term of derision in the young adult community. Not because they object to the “word” like I do. The term was actually coined to derided the concept; that relationship where he’s so hot and she’s so perfectly beautiful and they just met but they have to be together and will die for each other. I think the problem isn’t necessarily how quickly the relationship happens but how unsubstantiated it is. Because sometimes relationships happen fast. Authors only have 300-500 pages to make their […]

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forays into the unknown

forays into the unknown

I got the idea for my first novel in late Oct 2006. I toyed with it in fits and starts but I didn’t actually start writing it until Feb 2008. It was a fairy tale and the story of how I thought of it and what it became will be the beginning of my Idea Genesis series. At that time it was just going to be a novella because I didn’t know if I had enough story in me for a full novel. But regardless of the length, I was committed to writing it. I wanted to see if I could actually do it. And I dreamed of getting published […]

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Author Initiative

Author Initiative

As an aspiring author one of the things I’ve learned is that it’s easy in this writing/publishing industry to feel like you’re at everyone else’s mercy. This isn’t new territory for me after living in LA for years. Whether you’re a writer, actor, screenwriter, director of photography, costume designer, or almost any other creative profession you’re waiting for that agent to sign you – hoping that director notices you – wanting to be a part of that studio. And just like in the movie business, authors have the choice to step outside that system and do things on their own. Everyone I mentored in LA, anyone who asked for advice […]

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an open letter to Amazon

I try to be positive on this blog. I hope that the things I write are amusing or helpful or just fun in general. But sometimes things come to my attention that I feel strongly enough about and I need to say something out loud. And this is my place to do that. The girls over at Cuddlebuggery brought this bit of news to my attention: Amazon wins patent to sell previously read ebooks. As an aspiring writer, I find this pretty disturbing. I tweeted about it and I even sent an email to Amazon letting them know why I found it bothersome. I received the following response. I’m sorry […]

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Things of 2012

Things of 2012

Lots of people had great lists of books from 2012, much more creative ways of looking back like Tracy Neithercott’s YA Superlative Blogfest. I just have a boring old list of the best books I read in 2012 – but it’s got superb books on it! For my book list I went to goodreads and browsed all the books I read in 2012. I selected the books I remember loving and ended up with a list of 7 books. Random number, I know. I could have stuffed in three more to make it an even ten but didn’t feel like it. 7. The Other Countess by Eve Edwards I discovered […]

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NPR’s Teen Novel vote

NPR’s Teen Novel vote

You may or may not have heard that NPR is compiling a list of the Best Teen Novels Ever (you can vote here). In principle I think it’s a fun idea. Though the title, and therefore the premise, is a bit pompous. Best Teen Novels *Ever*? Really? I don’t know that you, or anyone, has the right to claim that about their list. Especially with so much controversy surrounding it. It may be open to voters, but who are you to decide which books do and do not make the list? Admittedly, that sort of arrogance bothers me. And then I disagree with pieces of their list on top of […]

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the unrecognizable expression

the unrecognizable expression

You know what I hate in books? When an author says: “a look she didn’t recognize crossed his face.” There are a dozen different variations on this but the essence is: someone is feeling something but the first person protagonist can’t make sense of it. It’s understandable – the book is written in first person so the reader is limited to what the protagonists perceives. But I don’t like it because I can interpret the expression even less than the protagonist (by virtue of not even actually seeing it). Saying that the protagonist doesn’t understand it frees the author from having to describe the expression or the emotion. But what’s […]

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I’m the one that’s cool

I’m the one that’s cool

When I first read Joel Stein’s dismissive of YA literature I admittedly bristled, much like Alyssa’s reaction at Think Progress. But then I looked a little closer as research for this post. First of all, this is part of a discussion by The New York Times on YA fiction, so while Stein is entitled to his opinion, I judge him a little less harshly knowing he’s reacting to a given topic rather than idly slamming a genre. And I have to admit that the majority of that discussion is about the virtues of young adult fiction with various authors saying it is powerful – focused on storytelling rather than narrative […]

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DNF: case in point

DNF: case in point

When I was younger I always finished books. Required reading doesn’t count in that statement because who really *wants* to read all of The Portrait of Dorian Gray when you can get the gist of it from class discussion? And ok I am a little bit curious to actually read it now. Anyway, when I was younger and I chose to read a book I always finished it. It helped that I didn’t ever really choose books I didn’t like. I was a voracious reader but now I realize not an especially broad reader. And by that I mean I probably only read 50 some odd books through all 8 […]

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the e-book blog

I don’t understand why the publishing industry hasn’t embraced e-books. I don’t know if anyone does, actually. From all appearances they have a product with virtually no cost to produce (since authors are profit participants and not actually paid for their time, even with hard copy). Why would anyone resist that? There are, in fact, several other factors at play. This is an interesting article that explains the price discrepancy between e-books and hard copy (which five major publishers and Apple are currently being sued over). The bottom line is publishers still make more money off hard copy per book. But that seems, to me, a short sighted equation. First […]

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